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The Quickest Driving Route Across Europe

 

 

Weather-wise, March isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

It’s cold, it’s wet, and the promise of Easter bank holiday being ‘just over the horizon’ isn’t quite enough to keep your spirits up.

Needless to say, most of us aren’t feeling particularly sprung from spring.

At the Motors.co.uk office, we call this strange purgatory in between the Christmas and Easter bank holiday ‘Dreamin’ Season’— the time where you will usually find us staring wistfully at the early bird flights for April bank holiday, day-dreaming about dramatic scenery, interesting architecture and good coffee.

Well, if you have a spare vehicle kicking about and fancy experiencing the stunning sights and vastly different cultures of Europe in an unconventional manner, why not check out this handy map created by University of Michigan professor, Randy Olson to get you in the mood for the trip of a lifetime.

Randy, being the helpful adventurer that he is, has mapped the fastest driving route across Europe starting in England and heading on to Italy, hitting everywhere in between.

Not only does the map calculate the quickest way around Europe, but it also takes into consideration each country’s major landmarks so you won’t need to factor in any extra time to ensure you’ve seen everything on your bucket list.

If you are prepared to put in some serious hours behind the wheel, there is nothing quite like the sense of autonomy and freedom you get from making your own way across foreign soil.

Picture yourself, and maybe an interesting companion, singing along to your favourite playlist, freshly squeezed orange juice in hand making your way through a breathtaking mountain range—ideal for those with itchy feet and a serious sense of adventure.

The entire journey is a colossal 26,211km (16,287 miles altogether) and would take 14 days if you drove non-stop. But because we know you need sleep and would probably rather enjoy your time away, we would estimate three months as a better indicator of how long you’ll need off of work.

Photo by Adrian on Unsplash

So if by some unlikely set of events you happen to have accrued three months’ worth of holiday, why not ignite your nomadic spirit and take to the road next time you need a break? If you can take the potential traffic jams, possible breakdowns and endless searches for a nearby service station, we would highly recommend experiencing Europe in this way.

 

By

February 20, 2019

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