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Job titles can change cost of car insurance

March 1, 2016 | By | In News

Motorists could avoid paying huge sums for their car insurance by rethinking their job title, Channel 4’s Supershoppers has revealed.

The loophole will be highlighted in the final episode of the series, which unveils the tricks of the retail trade.

Massive savings can be made when drivers list their professions under a slightly different name to that which they currently use. For example, a chef would pay on average £150 more than if they listed themselves as a kitchen worker, while a TV presenter will fork out £3,000 a year, compared with the £816 premium of a journalist.

Meanwhile, choosing ‘music teacher’ instead of ‘teacher’ on the drop-down list will add £33 to a driver’s yearly premium.

Presenters Andi Osho and Anna Richardson will reveal how picking one job title over another can make a significant difference to the overall cost.

“You do have to be honest when describing your job. You can’t claim to be something that you’re not, as that invalidates your insurance,” Richardson warned.

“Most insurers have pre-defined job titles but there may be more than one that accurately describes what you do.”

With the average car insurance premium in 2014 having cost £747 a year, it’s important for motorists to ensure that they’re getting a good deal.

A spokesperson for insurance company Admiral revealed how the premiums are worked out, reported the Daily Mail. “When we look at any rating factor, including occupation, we look at the cost and frequencies of claims that historically customers with that attribute have. We then rate more highly against those who have more claims and higher cost claims than those with fewer or lower cost.

“If there is a pricing difference between any two occupations that may seem similar then it will be because we have found them to have a different claims history.”

Jack Evans

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After completing his university studies in English and Creative Writing in Cardiff, Jack is now a full time motoring writer at Blackball Media. His love of cars stems from his childhood years when he began to live and breathe all-things automotive.

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