UK's most lucrative speed cameras revealed

July 28, 2016 | By | In News

The UK’s 10 most prolific speed cameras could have raised up to £30million in just three years, according to a Freedom of Information request submitted by the Sun.

Within that time the cameras have caught 291,677 speeding drivers, and if each driver paid their £100 fine, the grand total would not be far off the lucrative sum.

However, some of the drivers would have been untraceable, while others would have opted to take a speed awareness course in order to avoid the fine and points.

This figure also includes tickets accumulated by the emergency services on their way to call outs – tickets which will be scrapped.??

Despite these exceptions, the 10 cameras in question will have raised an incredibly high amount for the authorities.

The camera that caught the most speeders over the three years was on the A10 in Cheshunt, Herts, just north of London’s M25 motorway, flashing 38,206 cars.

Second worse was the camera on the A140 Mile End Road in Norwich, which caught 34,775 drivers, while third place went to the camera on the A1 Barrowby Thoms, Lincolnshire, with 34,555 flashes.

The camera on the A1134 Elizabeth Way in Cambridge took fourth place on the list, with 33,429 tickets, followed by the A4161 Newport Road, Cardiff camera took fifth, with 32,855, and a camera on the A28 Pin Hill in Canterbury took sixth with 25,069 penalties.

Seventh and eighth spots went to cameras on the A412 Rickmansworth Rd in Watford and the A16 Peak Parkway in Grimbsy, with 23,595 and 23,578 tickets issued respectively.?

Ninth place went to cameras from junction 4 to 7 of the M20 in Maidstone, catching 23,122 speeders, while a camera on the A15 in Snitterby, Lincolnshire took the final spot with 22,483.

RAC Foundation Director Steve Gooding said: “The whole point of installing a safety camera must be to improve road safety, often at high risk locations. Any camera that is raking in cash can’t be doing its job.

“Councils should be looking at the number of penalty notices issued, and where that number looks high, they should be urgently finding a better solution that actually works to promote road safety.”

Jack Evans

By

After completing his university studies in English and Creative Writing in Cardiff, Jack is now a full time motoring writer at Blackball Media. His love of cars stems from his childhood years when he began to live and breathe all-things automotive.

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close