Roadworks affect a third of car journeys

May 1, 2014 | By | In News

Road maintenance works delay 34 per cent of all journeys in the UK, adding 12 minutes to each trip, according to new research by insurance provider LV.

A Freedom of Information request to councils across the country revealed that there are currently almost 25,000 incomplete roadworks clogging the UK’s motoring arteries, covering an estimated 2,387 miles of the road network.

With such extensive coverage, it is perhaps unsurprising that the majority of drivers have had their journeys affected in some way. LV uncovered that 54 per cent of drivers have had to take a diversion due to roadworks in the last 12 months, while one in seven (14 per cent) have been late for appointments or meetings in the resultant traffic jams.

66%

of drivers feel that the quality of roads is getting worse

Worse still, some roadworks persist for well over a year. The oldest current works projects include the A629 Brow Lane in Halifax and those in Carey Street, London, both of which started over 18 months ago.

And despite large numbers of roadworks, motorists don’t feel as though they are seeing results. An average of £5.9million was spent by each council last year on road improvements and maintenance, but the majority of motorists (66 per cent) felt that the quality of roads in their area was getting worse, while 37 per cent believed that roadworks took too long to complete.

Peter Horton, Managing Director of LV= Road Rescue, commented: “Local authorities face a difficult challenge to repair and maintain our roads this year, particularly given the impact of the adverse weather we have seen in recent months.

“With more cars on the road than ever, it will be hard to carry out roadworks without impacting drivers. Sitting in traffic with the engine running for long periods of time can cause engine overheating and damage a car. To reduce the impact on your car, make sure it is regularly serviced and that you keep your oil and water topped up and if you are being held in stationary traffic for more than a minute, switch the engine off.”

Picture: Fotolia

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