Morning after drink-driving warning

December 9, 2014 | By | In News

A fifth of motorists have risked driving the morning after, even though they thought they might still be over the drink-drive limit, new research has found. Nineteen per cent of those who responded to a recent AA/Populus survey claimed that they had driven the morning after a night of heavy drinking, though they had concerns over how safe they were to drive.

However, more than half of motorists (54 per cent) do the right thing in attempting to avoid driving by deciding upon a designated driver before they head out. The survey of 19,887 UK adults also discovered that consuming a large amount of water and pigging out on a fried breakfast were the two most popular ways of attempting to reduce alcohol levels, reports the Western Morning News.

?The AA and drinks company Pernod Ricard UK have released these figures ahead of the festive period to coincide with their Christmas anti-drink driving campaign.

It is encouraging to see that many people are choosing to select a designated driver before a night out but it’s really important that they also consider arrangements for the morning after too.

Other results from this poll included the fact that more than half of respondents nominated a designated driver before going out, at 58 per cent of women and 52 per cent of men. However, while 58 per cent of those over 65 years old agreed upon a designated driver just 43 per cent of 18 to 24 year olds did.

Following the introduction of a lower drink-driving limit in Scotland nine per cent of drivers would opt for Irn Bru over alcohol, compared to just one per cent of those in the rest of the UK. Other ways cited by respondents of lowering their alcohol levels included going for a run and eating chocolate.

President of the AA Edmund King said: “It is encouraging to see that many people are choosing to select a designated driver before a night out but it’s really important that they also consider arrangements for the morning after too.

“Alcohol levels in the body can still mean that drivers are over the limit the following morning and we want to ensure that people are fully aware of this when they are making the decision whether or not to get behind the wheel.”

Picture: BRAD

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