Insurer texts parents if kids drive badly

March 30, 2015 | By | In News

Last week we wrote about a new young driver system from Chevrolet that tracks new motorists’ behaviour on the road and produces a ‘report card’ for parents, letting them know whether their offspring have exceeded the speed limit or activated the electronic safety systems by driving unsafely.

The latest telematics scheme to arrive in the UK, however, goes one step further by sending texts to parents to inform them that their children are driving poorly. Many drivers under 25 – who typically have few, if any, years no claims bonus, have resorted to so-called ‘black box’ telematics car insurance policies, which monitor their driving and assess their premium accordingly.

The reasoning for charging young drivers higher premiums follows statistics from the Association of British Insurers that show that the average cost of an insurance claim made by a driver aged 18-20 years old is £889 – just over twice the cost of claims made by 26-30-year-old motorists, reports The Telegraph. Meanwhile, drivers aged 25 or under are twice as likely to submit an insurance claim than those aged 61 an over, Office for National Statistics data shows.

We involve parents as we don’t want young drivers to ignore messages we send them, although we can withdraw the policy if they keep driving badly.

The rationale for informing parents about their children’s on-road behaviour comes as, not only are young drivers more likely to be involved in a collision on the road, but a large proportion still live with their parents, with 3.3 million 20 to 34 year olds – accounting for 26 per cent of the total – still living at home.

As result, some of the latest ‘black box’ telematics systems, which track drivers’ behaviour, can report young motorists to their parents for breaking the speed limit or braking overly heavily, with parents even able to pinpoint where on the road these incidents took place, using Google Maps.

“We contact parents, as well as phone call, text and update a driver’s online account if they don’t drive safely,” Crispin Moger of Marmalade, a specialist in young driver insurance, told The Telepgraph.

“We involve parents as we don’t want young drivers to ignore messages we send them, although we can withdraw the policy if they keep driving badly,” Mr Moger added.

Picture: petert2

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