Forty per cent of drivers not concentrating

February 11, 2014 | By | In News

Nearly half of drivers have admitted to not giving the road their full attention, according to a new survey by the Institute of Advanced Motorists.

Only 60 per cent of respondents said they were able to focus on the task of driving for the entire time they were out in their car, with daydreaming, astonishingly, given as the main reason, cited by nearly a quarter of drivers.

Contrary to popular opinion, it is older drivers that are most likely to give the road their full attention, with 73 per cent claiming they never get distracted while driving.

Simply not concentrating is a key cause of crashes yet it is not borne out in statistics because drivers rarely admit to it in police reports or on insurance forms.

Conversely, younger drivers are worse for getting distracted, with half of 18-24 year olds surveyed admitting to not concentrating on driving all of the time. Motorists aged 24-34 years-old are not much better, with 30 per cent admitting to driving distracted.

Drivers in London, Yorkshire and Scotland were found to be the most frequently distracted, with the more focussed drivers residing in Wales and the West Midlands.

Other than daydreaming, common causes for distraction in the car include stress, thinking about what to do upon arriving at a destination, and thinking about friends and loved ones.

IAM chief executive Simon Best said: “Signs of not concentrating such as missed turnings or uncancelled indicator lights are commonplace. Simply not concentrating is a key cause of crashes yet it is not borne out in statistics because drivers rarely admit to it in police reports or on insurance forms.

“These results reconfirm stereotypes surrounding younger drivers and the ease with which they can be distracted away from staying safe. The key is to build up as wide a range of experiences as possible as you learn and to look upon your driving as a skill that needs continuous improvement.”

What is most likely to distract you when behind the wheel? Have your say below.

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