Crackdown begins on airport car park charges

January 12, 2016 | By | In News

Following a 2015 study that found car parks at British Airports the most expensive in the world, a crackdown is planned on excessive charges imposed on parking for holidaymakers.

The study found that travellers flying from London City Airport were paying £315 a week to park their vehicle, unless they pre-booked on-line, where the fee more than halved to £128. Heathrow was similarly expensive, with parking costing £175 a week, although the airport offers a £31.43 winter discount price.

Another issue raised was the aggressive ‘no-stopping’ policies that saw a number of motorists fined £100 for halting for seconds to look at signs, or collect friends and family.

As a result, a review of road and rail access to airports will be carried out by the Civil Aviation Authority, to ensure that parking operators ‘compete fairly and efficiently, resulting in satisfaction and value for money for the consumer’.

The majority of airports subcontract parking operations to third-party providers, charging more the closer travellers park to the terminal.

Anthony Eskinazi, founder of the parking website, JustPark told The Telegraph: “We’ve long known that airport parking is vastly overpriced. When people are paying more for their airport parking than their flights, something needs to change.”

With the high prices charged by some parking operators, travellers would be forgiven in thinking that the security surrounding their cars was equally as high.

However, in August 2015, parking operator Airport Parking LTD were found guilty and fined £6,000 after they were found to have left travellers’ cars in unsecured fields, as opposed to the secure compound they had promised.

Charging £32.95 per vehicle per night, the Crawley based business left car windows open and kept the keys in an unattended box, a reality far from the 24-hour a day security presence promised.

Jack Evans

By

After completing his university studies in English and Creative Writing in Cardiff, Jack is now a full time motoring writer at Blackball Media. His love of cars stems from his childhood years when he began to live and breathe all-things automotive.

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