Brits spend over a year in traffic jams

October 28, 2013 | By | In News

British commuters will spend an average of one year and 88 days stuck in traffic jams over the course of their working lives, according to new research conducted by LHDcarsupermarket.com.

A study of office workers showed that on average, a commuter would spend 68 minutes sat in congestion, working out to over 5.5 hours a week and a staggering 11.3 days per year.

Over the course of a working career – four decades – time spent sat in queues adds up to 453.33 days, or nearly one and a quarter years.

Put into context, that is more time than it took for NASA’s Mars exploration probe to reach the red planet.

Most days I can expect to spend at least an hour and a half in the car and for the majority of that time I’m moving very slowly.

The figures were calculated by asking drivers to monitor their journey times into work, and then subtracting that by the time it would have taken them if there were no traffic on the roads.

One commuter who took part in the survey said: “I know that on a good day I can get to work in 20 minutes, however those instances are few and far between.

“Most days I can expect to spend at least an hour and a half in the car and for the majority of that time I’m moving very slowly.”

Another commented: “Bad traffic can start the day poorly and can make an awful day at the office even worse. I swear, some days it would take me less time to walk to work.”

Do you face traffic nightmares on your commute to work? Have you considered using alternative means of transport in a bid to cut time wasted sat in traffic jams? Have your say below.

Picture: Fotolia

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