British drivers are paying the price

November 27, 2013 | By | In News

Motorists in Britain are spending an average of £3453 a year on keeping their cars on the road – more than anywhere else in the world, Connor Mackay reports.

New research conducted by webuyanycar.com looked at the cost of running a car in 21 countries, across five continents.

The study took into account the cost of fuel, road tax, insurance, MOTs and road tolls.

The annual cost of keeping a car on the road in the UK is over £1000 more than in the USA, and over £2000 more than in China and Japan.

Oil-rich Saudi Arabia came in as the cheapest place to run a car, with a minuscule yearly outlay of £237.

Over a normal 12,500-mile year British motorists are paying an average of 27p per mile.

Richard Evans of webuyanycar.com said: “Most of us don’t stop to think how much each journey in the car costs. It is a massive outlay for the average household.”

A majority of this cost comes from soaring fuel prices. The average British motorist spends £2256 per year on fuel, while Americans spend less than £1000 and Saudi Arabians only £129.

Rising pump prices are causing drivers to alter their filling habits, with a further survey stating that one third of drivers in the UK wait for their fuel warning light before filling up.

Admiral Insurance also says that one quarter of drivers have run out of fuel before making it to a petrol station.

Car insurance is another crippling expense, costing an average of £667 per year, whereas in France the average is a mere £286, in Spain £350 and in Australia £383.

The average cost of road tax in Britain comes in at a staggering £225 per year – seven times more than Spain, Switzerland and Russia. In Canada, South Africa and New Zealand there is no road tax.

The FairFuelUK campaign states that these results prove that a cut in the ‘toxic’ fuel duty is needed from Chancellor George Osborne in next month's Autumn Statement.

Howard Cox, co-founder of the campaign, said that motorists in Britain are now spending up to 15 per cent of their income on fuel alone.

He added: “The UK remains the highest for fuel tax in the EU, with the Treasury taking 60 per cent of what goes into our tanks in duty and VAT.”

How is the rising cost of motoring affecting the way that you use your car? Have your say below.

Picture: Fotolia

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