AA slams MPs for ignoring inflated fuel costs

April 20, 2015 | By | In News

Politicians may have blown their own trumpet about addressing high energy costs, but the major parties have done nothing to address unfairly inflated fuel prices on forecourts, the AA has claimed.

Despite months of falling wholesale oil prices, motorists in the UK are still being ripped off, states the motoring organisation, with political parties failing to address this issue in the run up to the general election.

Figures from the AA show that the cost of oil fell by five per cent between March and April this year, though average prices at the pumps rose from 111.92p per litre in mid-March to 113.29p the next month. Diesel prices saw a similar rise from 118.19p per litre to 118.83p over the same period.

Addressing motorists’ concerns over the prices they are charged on forecourts, AA president, Edmund King, said: “Cars are like blank cheques for whoever feels the need to balance the books by plundering drivers' pockets”, the Press Association reports.

Motorists prop up the Treasury to the tune of 10 per cent of the UK's total tax-take, and now the fuel retailers are taking £3 a tank extra on diesel to steady their finances.

"Motorists prop up the Treasury to the tune of 10 per cent of the UK's total tax-take, and now the fuel retailers are taking £3 a tank extra on diesel to steady their finances.”

Highlighting the hypocrisy of addressing inflated domestic energy bills but not overpriced fuel, King continued: "Manifestos promise action and transparency on domestic energy bills, but nothing on road fuel price transparency."

Fuel prices also vary across the country, with the cheapest average fuel prices being available in London, south east England, Yorkshire and Humberside – where a litre of petrol stands at 113.p – while the average Scottish price stands at 113.8p per litre.

Diesel prices vary more, however, with the cheapest diesel being found in Northern Ireland – costing an average of 117.7p per litre – and the most expensive being in Scotland, setting drivers back 119.6p per litre on average.

Picture: Minerva Studios

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