1 in 4 motorists admit driving when tired

November 23, 2016 | By | In News
Male entrepreneur sleeping in the car while driving on the road at traffic jam

In Great Britain, there were over 185,000 road traffic injuries and fatalities in the 12 months before June 2016, yet nearly 139,000 could have been prevented if motorists were less distracted when driving.

Whilst loss of concentration through tiredness is well documented to be the greatest cause of road accidents (62%), a new survey by Exchange and Mart reveals that nearly 1 in 4 motorists readily admit to regularly driving in these circumstances – and men are more prone to driving when tired than women.

Whilst only 9% of motorists surveyed by Exchange and Mart said they use their mobile phone when driving, mobile phone usage by drivers remains the second most common cause of road traffic accidents. Interestingly, 33% motorists in the 18-24% age bracket admitted to frequently using their mobile phone while driving. It is illegal to drive while using a mobile phone and motorists caught by the police will receive 3 points on their driving licence and £100 fine.

Interestingly, 33% of motorists in the 18-24 age bracket admitted to frequently using their mobile phone while driving. It is illegal to drive while using a mobile phone and motorists caught by the police will receive 3 points on their driving licence and £100 fine.

Jim Murray Jones, General Manager for Exchange and Mart, said:  “Our survey results reveal that men and women are equally and most commonly distracted by their passengers, ensuring the air con is ‘just so’ and the music choice is to their liking.

“However, men are more prone to being distracted by eating and drinking than women, who are sidetracked by adjusting mirrors, seatbelts and seat positioning.  Whatever the distraction, as many as 72% of drivers have admitted to multitasking whilst driving and as such are putting themselves and their passengers at considerable risk. “

James Ash

By

Content Marketing Executive at Motors.co.uk

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