Many drivers wouldn’t admit causing damage

July 31, 2014 | By | In Advice

Three in 10 drivers in the UK would make a quick exit if they slightly damaged someone else’s car, a survey has revealed. Four per cent even claimed that they would make a run for it after causing serious damage to the other vehicle, the poll of 2,021 UK adults found.

This survey, commissioned by ContractHireAndLeasing.com, discovered that 52 per cent of respondents would own up if they caused any damage. However, four per cent would make a swift exit if no one was around – even if they had caused substantial damage to the other vehicle.

The older British generation are showing the rest of us the right path by being honest no matter who may, or may not, have seen the accident.

Responses varied dramatically depending on location and age. People in the north-east were deemed the least honest, with seven per cent answering that they would make a run for it if they caused major damage – nearly twice as high as the national average. A further 36 per cent of drivers in the north-east claimed that they’d leave if they caused minor damage.

At the other end of the table, Scottish drivers were deemed the most honest, with 63 per cent saying that they would leave contact details or wait for the car owner to return. Just 22 per cent of motorists in Scotland would not own up to causing minor damage.

Overall, Glasgow was rated as the most honest city, with 70 per cent saying that they’d hold their hands up to damage. The least-honest cities were Bristol, with a score of just 43 per cent, and Oxford and London, which scored 46 per cent. Age also played a part, with a higher proportion of older drivers admitting to causing damage.

David Timmis, Managing Director of ContractHireAndLeasing.com, said: "The older British generation are showing the rest of us the right path by being honest no matter who may, or may not, have seen the accident." Seven times more people aged between 25 and 34 years old would make a run for it than people aged over 65.

                Picture: Fotolia – 7horses

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